Why Do Spa Covers Get Heavy?

Every traditional foam filled spa cover gets heavy. The how and why might come as a surprise. It really has less to do with rain so it doesn’t matter how steep the taper is, that cover will still get heavy. If it had been rain that was making hot tub covers heavy then putting a roof over the spa would stop the cover from getting heavy.
Moisture getting trapped in the foam is the thing that eventually makes a hot tub cover too heavy to lift. However if it’s not the rain, how does the water get in there? The actual answer is steam beginning with the warm spa water. When water becomes steam it is a much smaller molecule than a drop of water.
Steam will get right into a smaller sized area, like say the spaces in the foam. Once it cools back down and turns into water again, it’s trapped stuck inside the foam. Once trapped in the foam the water won’t drain out so a drain hole won’t help. The only way the water could possibly get back out of the foam would be to evaporate. In order to evaporate, the spa cover would have to be removed from the source of steam (the hot tub) and placed within a dry, well ventilated area.
The problem has nothing to do with how well the cover is cared for or just how much vinyl protector is rubbed on it. The reality is it’s the foam itself. The type of foam utilized in hot tub covers is able to be used as insulation in DRY conditions. For instance it truly works well in floors, walls and ceilings (provided it is kept dry) and is actually great for refrigeration applications.
However if exactly the same foam is exposed to steam, the insulation it might offer is quickly reduced to something similar to wet plywood.

Then why is foam still getting used in spa covers? It’s cheap and it’s the industry standard. But simply because everybody is doing it doesn’t ensure it is the most beneficial idea.
One-hundred years ago the regular means of travel was the horse. The horse was the standard for years and years. Until anything better was developed.
A more informed idea in terms of spa covers go would be the one that eliminates the foam, still insulates but stays light weight and easy to work with.
Three decades ago, (yes really, 3 decades ago) that’s the way in which the SpaCap was developed. A single woman with back trouble, needed to be able to use her hot tub each day for therapy. She had to be able to get her cover on and off by herself without further injuring her back.
The Spa Cover she eventually developed was light weight, very simple to use and insulated as well as a foam filled hot tub cover. Even though it has gone through many improvements in the past few years, the basic idea and principle remains exactly the same. SpaCap.com builds custom hot tub covers for all varieties of spas including Swim Spas.
Don’t go out and buy another foam filled spa cover because that’s what your neighbors do. Visit SpaCap.com and get a hot tub cover that won’t get heavy or break and is going to make it easy for you to use your spa year after year!

Signs It’s Time For a New Spa Cover

Hot tub covers are imperative, if your goal is to keep that water warm within the hot tub. Unfortunately, they don’t last forever. Despite what your spa dealer could possibly have promised, there will come a moment when you will require a replacement hot tub cover.
What are the signs when your current hot tub cover has given up the ghost? Often there are obvious signs, and those that won’t be so obvious indicators. Here’s 5 warning signs of spa cover distress to take into consideration.
Saggy Cover
If your foam filled hot tub cover collects water on the outside, it is time for a new spa cover. This is an indication that whatever was done with regards to the reinforcement of the foam boards is being bent or broken. You can find typically a C-channel that runs along both halves of the spa cover, where they meet at the hinge. Some cover manufacturers might use materials like aluminum or thin steel at this point which will bend under weight (dogs, kids, snow), or (more typically) due to the weight of the cover itself.
If so, looking for a way to milk a longer time out of the cover will only set you back more as time passes by since whatever insulation value it could have had is gone at this stage. Delaying the inevitable will just cost you more in your energy bills. But more importantly from a usage standpoint, you are not going to wish to mess with your cover when it has water on top of it. Ultimately, you’re utilizing your hot tub less that is definitely a sin. Don’t be a sinner.
Something to think about here. Regardless of what your hot tub dealer has got to say about it, if he only intends to sell you another foam filled cover, it is 100% positively going to end up just like the one you are trying to replace now.
It won’t matter if it’s shrink wrapped in Kevlar and reinforced with titanium, if it has foam inside of it, it is doomed to fail.
Puddle Cover
Water is heavy, at 8 lbs per gallon, it can add up quickly. Another case of broken reinforcement channel. Probably started out with a small crimp in the channel, which started to puddle some water, and then some more water … until it looks undeniable that a new spa cover is in order.
Just like Saggy Cover, this is due to using foam panels over a hot tub. Foam panels will soak up moisture from the steam coming off the spa water. Nothing could prevent it except not using foam inside the cover!
The spa dealer may suggest you to attempt to flip the panels over contained in the cover to prolong the life span. Except the zippers and the vinyl material have not been made to be opened and shut beyond the initial stuffing of the foam.
Once the cover begins a gradual puddle, it may never be reversed. It is time to invest in a replacement hot tub cover. As we said above, putting it off means you’ll be utilizing the hot tub less (a sin) and wasting money on a higher heating bill.
Water Logged Spa Cover
This may be a spa cover that weighs about 3x what you actually had when it was new. They can get so heavy as to become hazardous to move without having the aid of a Seal Team. They might also damage spa cover lifters once they get too heavy. This is because the cover lifter is not made to handle the weight of a saturated cover. Bet the dealer didn’t cover that little detail when he sold it to you.
happens when the foam core is taking on water – and, is not draining. It does not signify that rain water has somehow entered your cover, or snow or various other outside source. It is the natural result when steam rises from the warm spa water and then because it’s a really small molecule, gets up into the foam. Once it gets within the foam it cools and turns back into water, and becomes trapped because the water molecule is too big to fall out.
The best way to prevent it would be to never use a foam filled cover on your hot tub. It doesn’t matter what the manufacturer claims to wrap it in or the way they package it, the foam will eventually become saturated. Period.
It’s time for a new replacement hot tub cover. Again, putting it off now is just going to cost you more in heating bills and unless you happen to have a Seal Team living with you, you are not going to be using your spa all too often. (still a sin)
If you want to be clever, you can take the cover off your spa and store it in your garage for several months. As soon as the cover is away from the moisture and being stored inside a dry place, eventually the moisture inside the cover will evaporate (back to a smaller molecule) and of course the foam will become light again. It will take months for it to dry completely and that means you must have another replacement cover for the spa while you wait. Note:The cover may still warp wildly out of shape while it dries.
If you rotate your covers every three months, you might be capable of making them last till the materials finally come apart. See Below.
Torn & Worn Spa Cover
When the fabric (marine grade vinyl on the standard foam filled spa covers) is exposed to too much sun and weather, it becomes brittle and begins to deteriorate. Eventually, holes and tears happen that will .
Due to the fact that ALL Vinyls, including the most expensive Marine Grade, are rated by HOURS outdoors.
Using a spa cover protectant is just another method for spa cover dealers to take your money. If you want to spend every week rubbing down your hot tub cover with conditioner, go ahead but the smart thing to do should be to purchase a cover that doesn’t have VINYL on the exterior.
Still, in the event the cover isn’t heavy yet, you may postpone purchasing a another right away providing you don’t mind the look of Duct Tape. If you would like some tips, explore some episodes of the “Red Green Show.” Red covers the finer points of Duct Tape.
Smelly Spa Cover
Musty, mildew, old wet dog – whatever your spa cover smells like, if it’s a bad odor, that probably means that you have got bacteria forming inside the hot tub cover. It probably also means that the cover is water logging (see above).
Now we have crossed over from inconvenient to unhealthy.
What are you breathing in if this is what you smell?
Completely dismantling the cover, and spraying it down with Lysol won’t help! Because the source of the smell, AKA the mold and mildew are inside the foam! At best you might be able to kill what’s on the outside of the vinyl or foam even so you are not able to touch what’s inside the foam. Plus now your cover smells like Lysol, nothing kills the mood faster than inhaling something that reminds you of how the school janitor cleaned up vomit.

The source of the problem? That high quality foam used in traditional spa covers. Despite how much a dealer may attempt to sell how it is extremely resistant to water absorption and bacteria formation, it will still happen and they understand it.
When you happen to be ready for a different spa cover, be sure that it’s not made using a foam core.

5 reasons that you’re going to need a new spa cover – in the event you were curious about your hot tub cover lasting another year. Don’t wait. It’s your basic instinct telling you something important – hot tub season is coming! Prepare now!

Hot Tub Covers and R Value

The goal of R Value and traditional foam filled Spa Covers
R-value serves as a measurement of the protection from heat transfer for materials like that of the fiberglass insulation in a house or the insulating foam in traditional spa covers. In principle, the higher the R value, the better the heat storage and, heat storage would be the primary responsibility of any spa cover.
Most industries using R-values are regulated by FTC standards. Commercially sold insulation must pass independent tests provided by the American Standards and Testing Methods (ASTM) in order to be advertised or marked using their R Value.

The Myth: As there is no FTC recognized independent test for spa covers, so any R value stated of a spa cover dealer is an unregulated, unmonitored “interpretation” of the insulation value. It is open to opinion and abuse, from adding the R value coming from the air space between the water and the bottom of the cover, the space between the vinyl and the cover insulation, or simply blatantly inflating the fictitious number. Some hot tub dealers state only the known R-value of the insulation itself, but that does not mean it was tested and approved to be in hot tub cover applications.
The R-value of a given foam insulation, it does not matter the density, is ONLY rated for use in DRY building applications! That means that the R rating of the foam is only applicable when it happens to be used in a wall, attic or floor. Because if it was used in a moist environment, that type of insulation would fail quickly.

Foam Density and Foam Thickness.
These two factors that spa cover dealers claim influence the R-value of a spa cover, when in fact that R rating itself has nothing to do with the foam when it is used in a hot tub cover. Actually, it is as misleading as the hypothesis that a taper of a cover will actually keep it from getting heavy.
True, the foam density and thickness would have an impact on the insulation properties In the event the Usage of the foam were in a location that met with the designed use of an absolutely DRY environment.
It doesn’t matter if the dealer claims his spa covers are made with the ultimate spa cover foam (rigid cellular polystyrene thermal insulation) available, resists breakage, vapor absorption and chemical damage greater than all the others they’ve tested. But, R factor never is something they test, and RESISTING breakage and saturation is not nearly the same as AVOIDING it altogether.

When shopping for and comparing spa covers, ALL claims associated with R value of a cover that utilizes foam are totally unsubstantiated. Foam Density and Foam Thickness do not have any ADDED R VALUE, since the foam is not meant to be applied above a wet environment. Most spa cover dealers repeat the same numbers therefore hot tub owners have come to believe the lie. Many hot tub cover dealers employ some fancy charts to substantiate their claims, nevertheless the point is is those claims are not backed up by the ASTM.
Myth Busted!
R value testing of materials is completed at room temperature, and doesn’t tackle moisture and vapor. In the spa environment, there exists hot water with plenty of steamy moisture. Both of these will dramatically decrease the R-value of any foam. A spa at 105 degrees will defeat the R-value of any foam tested to use in a dry application.
You should never let the R value of foam be your measurement for spa cover quality. instead search for a spa cover with NO FOAM. A hot tub cover which uses air filled chambers in lieu of rigid foam boards will out preform any other, in any test or real hot tub application.

Don’t be swayed by claims of high density and weight, vacuum wrapped in sheets of heat welded polyethylene, sealed in heavy gauge marine grade vinyl, with chemical resistant scrim and stitching. It won’t insulate as well. Without a doubt it is going to still become saturated, warped or broken. It was obsolete 3 decades ago.
More information about Hot Tub Covers is available at SpaCap.

Choosing the Best Hot Tub Cover

Your hot tub cover will protect your water from debris, animals, and some airborne bacteria, while also trapping the heat inside and saving you money. Naturally you want to get the most cover for your money. You want a cover that will do the job and last a long time. The following are a few tips for picking out your hot tub cover.

The Fit

Make sure it fits. Your hot tub cover should fit snugly over all sides of the hot tub, and should rest very close to or on the surface of the water. If the sides are loose, then animals could crawl in to get to the warmth or the hot water will evaporate and escape.

If it is too high off the surface of the water, hot water will evaporate, cling to the underside of the cover, then cool and drop back down into the water, lowering its overall temperature. Not to mention that the evaporation and condensation cycle would tend to release or use up the spa chemicals.

Ideally, the bottom of the cover would be on the water surface since that is what we want to keep warm.

Because we have been in this hot tub cover business a while, we have seen every manner of ill fitting, broken, taped, tarp covered, and otherwise “beyond it’s normal life span” attempt to put off getting a replacement cover.

Heavy Hot Tub Covers keep people out of the spa
If your cover looks like this you’re probably not using the hot tub today

This not only looks terrible but it costs you money because all of these efforts don’t really help. If you’re going to drain your spa and get rid of it, fine. But if you intend to keep using it, investing in the right cover is going to help.

The Insulation

Make sure it traps heat efficiently. As we stated before, a hot tub cover that sits up on the edge of the spa, several inches off the water surface, will trap evaporating water and cause it to condense and cool, then fall back into the spa lowering the temperature of the water.

What also occurs is the foam inside a traditional cover absorbs steam because it is a small molecule than water, then the water vapor condenses and becomes trapped in the foam material over time. Once the spaces in the foam have been filled with moisture whatever insulation value it did have is gone. A water logged cover has the same insulation value as a sheet of plywood.

Hot ub Cover held down with sand bags
If this is how you keep your hot tub cover in place you need a new cover!

The moisture also causes the cover to slowly become heavy until it either can’t be lifted or breaks under its own weight.

It gets worse. One of the other adverse effects of the saturated cover sitting way off the water surface, the cover will freeze when the outdoor temperature is below freezing. Because the outside of the cover is actually in contact with the freezing temperature outside and not in contact with the spa water it becomes a solid block of ice.

From the outside it may appear to be doing a great job insulating because snow will pile up on top of the cover. That’s because snow doesn’t mind sitting on ice. Unfortunately, your spa is working harder than ever trying to keep the spa water heated underneath that frozen cover.

To avoid the spa cover from becoming a solid block of ice over your hot tub in winter, you need to get one that does not sit up on the top of the edge of the spa, several inches off the water surface. You need a cover that won’t soak up moisture and freeze. A cover that will insulate the water at the water surface, like the SpaCap.

SpaCap hot tub cover in winter conditions
SpaCap on duty in winter

Weather Proof

Make sure it’s weather proof. If your hot tub is stored outside and not under shelter, then the cover must be durable enough to withstand rain, wind, snow, and potentially hail or winter precipitation. The cover must also prevent rainwater and wind from getting into the hot tub and cooling down the water.

So you need to have a cover that can keep the rain and debris running off, with a taper or better yet a dome shape

The tapered cover, is usually sold with the idea that it will keep the rain running off and because of that it won’t get heavy. If that were true, no tapered foam filled hot tub cover would ever get heavy. But it isn’t true because the do get heavy.

Every tapered, foam filled cover ever sold will get heavy because the moisture doesn’t come from outside the hot tub. In fact the only way to insure that a foam filled hot tub cover won’t get heavy is to never use it. If you never put it over hot water where steam can infiltrate into the foam it will never get heavy.

So if no foam filled hot tub cover ever made can keep from soaking up moisture once it’s in place over warm water, the solution is NOT to buy another foam filled spa cover, but to get one that does not use foam panels. The SpaCap are the only hot tub covers that won’t saturate.

Let’s talk for a minute about spa cover lifters because a lot of hot tub owners have fallen for the idea that a lifter will be the solution to a heavy cover. But it is not, because every lifter ever made is designed to work with a light weight cover.

Think about it. You still have to flop half the cover over the bar before the lifter is used. In most cases, that first lift is the one that is beyond hot tub owners. But if you did manage to open it halfway and then push the lifter hard enough to move a heavy cover, something has to give.

Either the spa cover will rip itself apart because it can’t hold it’s own weight or the lifter will rip itself off the hot tub cabinet. So a “lifter” is NOT the answer to a cover you can’t lift.

The only hot tub cover that won’t become saturated is the one with no foam. You need a spa cover that uses air chambers to do the insulating instead. The SpaCap.

If your spa cover is trying to make a bridge over the spa, then a heavy wet snow load will crush it. If the bottom of your spa cover rests on the water, it can transfer the weight of the snow and handle almost any snow load. In thirty years of building the SpaCap hot tub covers, and selling them in mountain retreats all over the world, not one has ever been crushed by snow.

If your spa cover has a rigid surface, the wind can eventually lift it off the spa and take it to parts unknown.

The physics of this are fairly simple, wind hits the side of the spa and then goes up and over. As the wind sweeps over the top of the spa it creates a vacuum above the rigid foam cover until it lifts it off the hot tub. Once it does the following wind pushes into the space below the cover and the water surface. As the air rushes in it compresses in the space until it pops the rigid cover up. At that point, lift off has occurred and the hot tub cover has become a wing.

Depending on the strength of the wind the cover can fly for miles.

The reason is that the rigid cover presents a surface that the wind can lift making it a wing.

This is where the natural dome shape of the SpaCap makes all the difference. There is no rigid surface for the wind to create lift. The natural dome shape just redirects the winds harmlessly away. Even Hurricane force winds won’t budge it.

In the past thirty years, hundreds of SpaCap hot tub covers have been sold in Tornado Alley and in areas that get hurricanes. Not ONE SpaCap has EVER flown away. They are the only truly Wind Proof Hot Tub Covers.

Pet Safe

Make sure it’s animal proof. Pets and wild animals are sometimes drawn to hot tubs by their heat, and some very small animals will even try to make their homes inside of a thick hot tub cover. Other animals crawl underneath the cover seeking warmth and end up falling in the water and drowning. Make sure the cover doesn’t allow any space for animals to go underneath it, and make sure it is made of material that animals can’t chew through to make their home.

Let’s face it, no cover is perfectly animal proof. But the SpaCap can handle more animal problems than any foam cover ever could. We used to say that no animal has ever damaged one. But in the last thirty years there have been some persistent creatures. There was a bear in Whistler BC that decided he wanted to take a dip in the spa. There was a raccoon in Bellevue WA that tore one up so he could wash his food. In both cases no traditional foam filled cover would have been able to do better.

All total, far more animals have damaged foam filled spa covers than the SpaCap.

More information about hot tub covers is available at SpaCap.

Hot Tub Covers and the R-Value

The Myth of R-Value and traditional foam filled Hot Tub Covers.

R-value is a form of measurement of the ability to resist heat transfer for materials like the fiberglass insulation in your house or maybe the insulating foam in hot tub covers. The intent is that, the greater the R-value, the better the heat storage and, heat retention would be the primary job of any hot tub cover.

Most industries using R-values are regulated by FTC standards. Commercially sold insulation must pass independent tests created by American Standards and Testing Methods (ASTM) so as to be advertised or marked using their R-Value.

The Misled Masses: As there is no FTC recognized independent test for spa covers, So ANY stated R-value stated by a spa cover dealer is in reality an unregulated, unmonitored “interpretation” of a given insulation value. It is open to misrepresentation and abuse, from adding the R-value of an air space between the water and the bottom of the cover, spacing between the vinyl and the cover insulation, or simply blatantly inflating the fictitious number. Some hot tub dealers state exclusively the known R-value of the insulation itself, but of course that doesn’t mean that it was tested and endorsed to use in hot tub cover applications.

The R-value of the actual foam insulation, no matter the density, is ONLY rated for use in DRY building applications! Which signifies the fact that the R rating of the foam is only applicable should it happen to be applied in a wall, attic or floor. Because should it were to be used in a moist environment, that type of insulation would fail quickly.

R-values

Foam Density and Foam Thickness.

These two factors that spa cover dealers claim affect the R-Value of a spa cover, when in fact that R rating itself has nothing to do with the foam when it is used in a hot tub cover. Actually, it is as misleading as the idea that a taper on the cover will really keep it from getting heavy.

True, the foam density and thickness would have a bearing on the insulation properties In the event the Usage of the foam were in compliance with the designed use of a completely DRY environment.

Regardless if the dealer claims his spa covers are made with the most costly spa cover foam (rigid cellular polystyrene thermal insulation) available, resists breakage, vapor absorption and chemical damage more than all the others they’ve tested. The truth is, R factor is NOT something they test, and RESISTING breakage and saturation are not the same as AVOIDING it altogether.

When looking for and comparing spa covers, ALL claims associated with R-value of a cover that has foam are totally unsubstantiated. Foam Density and Foam Thickness do not have any ADDED R-VALUE, since the foam is not designed to be applied over a wet environment. Most spa cover dealers repeat exactly the same numbers and consequently hot tub owners have been trained to believe the lie. Some dealers employ some fancy charts to substantiate their claims, however the main point is those claims cannot be in accordance to the ASTM.

Myth Busted!

R-value testing of materials is completed at room temperature, and doesn’t take into account moisture and vapor. In the spa environment, there is hot water and good amounts of steamy moisture. Each of which will dramatically reduce the R-Value of any foam. A spa at 105 degrees will defeat the R-Value of any foam tested to use in a dry application.

Don’t allow the R-Value of foam be considered the measurement for spa cover quality. Instead search for a spa cover with NO FOAM. A hot tub covers that use air filled chambers as an alternative for rigid foam boards will out preform any other, in any test or real hot tub application. (Hello, SpaCap)

 

Don’t be fooled by claims of high density and weight, vacuum wrapped in sheets of heat welded polyethylene, sealed in heavy gauge marine grade vinyl, with chemical resistant scrim and stitching. It won’t insulate as well. It will definitely still become saturated, warped or broken. It truly was obsolete thirty years ago.

Why Do Hot Tub Covers Get Heavy?

Heavy Hot Tub CoverEvery traditional foam filled hot tub cover gets heavy. But the how and why may come as a surprise. It has nothing to do with rain so it doesn’t matter how steep the taper is, that cover will still get heavy. If it was rain that was making hot tub covers heavy then putting a roof over the spa would stop the cover from getting heavy.

Moisture getting trapped in the foam is what eventually makes a cover too heavy to lift. But if it’s not the rain, how does the water get in there? The answer is steam from the warm spa water. When water becomes steam it is a much smaller molecule than a drop of water.

Steam can get into a much smaller area, like say the spaces in the foam. Once it cools back down and turns into water again, it’s trapped inside the foam. Once trapped in the foam the water won’t drain out so a fancy drain hole won’t help. The only way the water can get back out of the foam would be to evaporate. In order to evaporate, the hot tub cover would have to be removed from the source of steam (the hot tub) and placed in a dry, well ventilated area.

The problem has nothing to do with how well the cover is cared for or how much vinyl protector is rubbed on it. The problem is the foam. The type of foam used in hot tub covers is designed to be used as insulation in DRY conditions. For instance it works well in floors, walls and ceilings (provided it is kept dry) and is great for refrigeration applications.

However if the same foam is exposed to steam, the insulation it could offer is quickly reduced to something equivalent to wet plywood.Another Heavy Hot Tub Cover

So why is foam still being used in hot tub covers? It’s cheap and it’s the industry standard. But just because everybody is doing it doesn’t make it the best idea.

A hundred years ago the standard mode of travel was the horse. The horse had been the standard for hundreds of years. Until something better came along.

A better idea as far as hot tub covers go would be one that eliminates the foam, still insulates but stays light weight and easy to use.

Thirty years ago, (yes really, thirty years ago) that is how the SpaCap was developed. A single woman with back trouble, needed to be able to use her hot tub every day for therapy. She had to be able to get her cover off and on by herself without further injuring her back.

The cover she eventually came up with was light weight, easy to use and insulated as well as a foam filled hot tub cover. Although it has gone through many improvements over the years, the concept and principle is still the same. SpaCap.com builds custom hot tub covers for all kinds of spas including swim spas.

Don’t go out and purchase another foam filled hot tub cover just because that’s what the neighbors do. Visit SpaCap.com and get a cover that won’t get heavy or break and will make it easy for you to use your spa for years to come!

SpaCap Hot Tub Cover

Toddler Falls on Hot Tub Cover

It’s not everyday that hot tub covers make the news. Recently in Florida a toddler fell from a three story balcony and landed on, you guessed it a hot tub cover.

Here’s a link to the story

Now, as a grandparent the first thing that comes to mind is, “How did this happen?” Not to say we are disappointed to have a happy ending (the little boy was fine and ran back up stairs to tell his grandfather what happened) but how did the little guy fall?

Let’s lock the sliding glass door and prevent this future stuntman from repeating this maneuver. Next time he might miss the hot tub entirely.

A few years ago “Dwarf Tossing” was a thing. Then “Dwarf Bowling” and a few other manifestations along the same lines. Without taking a side as to the rights of little people to be tossed for sport and amusement, let’s just nip “Toddler Tossing” in the bud before it too becomes the new fun activity.

In our personal experience a lot of things seem like a good idea to toddlers. Many of them seem to lack the “fear” gene or chromosome to alert them to potential serious consequences. As entertaining as it may be to watch videos of animals misjudging their leaping abilities, no one wants to see this with toddlers.

If on the other hand you would like to lay your toddler gently on your spa cover for some reason, let’s go over some ground rules first to ensure safety and happy endings.

First rule. The spa or hot tub must be no higher than deck level. If your hot tub is free standing, the distance from the edge of the spa to the ground would be enough to damage your toddler so better to lay the little bugger on the ground than on the spa. If on the other hand your spa is flush with the deck it MAY be okay. Move on to rule two.

Rule Two. The cover must be properly secured in such a way as to insure that the toddler cannot by accident or intent gain access to the spa water below. Neither by a fall from a great height, significant impact or any other instance. Toddler Approved Hot Tub Cover

Rule Three. The hot tub cover must be a comfortable place to lay one’s toddler. If the hot tub cover is a rigid piece of foam it must be considered not suitable for toddler laying. If the spa cover allows a cushion like softness that will comfort and embrace the toddler then proceed to rule three.

Kid Tested Hot Tub Covers
This is only a demonstration of ruggedness. Please do not try this with your own hot tub cover. Damage caused by this would NOT be covered by warranty.

Rule Four. If a toddler is resting comfortably on a soft hot tub cover, there should be jumping on the cover by any other person or animal. This would dislodge the toddler and could potentially cause harm.

If you or someone you know would like to purchase such a hot tub cover, please visit SpaCap.com.

Hot Tub Covers and Hail Damage

We get a lot of inquiries from spa owners that are replacing their Hot Tub Covers due to hail damage. Traditional rigid foam covers get hammered by hail because they don’t absorb impact very well. As people who live in areas of heavy hail storms know, anything rigid is going to take a pounding.

The solution to this would be something that is able to give or absorb impacts. In Hollywood when a stunt man falls from a great height, he wants to land on something that will absorb his impact like an air bag. The air bags the stunt man lands on are designed made from the same materials as the SpaCap.

Now the stunt air bag is designed to open and release air when it “catches” the stunt person so please don’t use your SpaCap this way. However if your house is on fire and you have to jump out of the window to save your life aiming for the SpaCap would probably save your life.

However you are a little bigger than the typical hail stone and the damage from you jumping on Hot Tub Covers would not be covered by the warranty. But no matter how fierce the storm or the hail stone the SpaCap will give or catch it without damage. We have tested it by driving golf balls into it, dropping bowling balls on them and just having them in use around the country in areas that get severe hail storms.

We do a brisk business replacing foam filled covers crushed after a storm but so far not even one of the SpaCap hot tub covers have ever been damaged by hail.

Spa Covers and Sun damage

If you own a hot tub in Texas, Arizona or at altitude in the Rockies you know what sun exposure can do to vinyl spa covers.

The reason is all vinyls are rated by hours outdoors. Normally 1500 hrs outdoors is pretty standard which amounts to about 100 days if you only count daylight hours. Makes it seem kind of silly to put vinyl on anything that’s going to be outdoors.Swim Spa Cover Damaged by sun

Vinyl will always crack and fall apart eventually if it is exposed to temperature extremes and or UV. That’s why Sunbrella™ was invented. It has been the gold standard in outdoor fabric for more than forty five years.

Sunbrella™ is manufactured by Glen Raven Mills here in the USA. Made from acrylic fiber woven into a canvas like fabric it offers the breathability of canvas without the shrinkage, rotting or fading. One of the great advantages of breathable fabric is that it does not trap moisture in like vinyl where it can grow mildew. If rigid foam spa covers smell like mildew, the vinyl on the outside is one of the reasons why. Since acrylic is the same stuff most spas are made of Sunbrella™ is incredibly durable.

Sunbrella™ doesn’t crack in cold like vinyl, or fade like canvas. If you live near a marina every boat top you see out there in a bright color is Sunbrella™. Anything else would fade out quickly, even the paint on the boat will fade before the Sunbrella™ will.

Years ago a neighbor came to me and wanted me to repair his sail cover. His sail cover had been on his sail boat for twelve years, through all the weather the northwest pacific coast could through at it. For those of you who don’t know sailing, the typical sail material needs to be protected from exposure when not in use so it is bundled and covered with a sail cover. The sail cover is the shield that covers the expensive sail from damage.

My neighbors sail cover was made from Sea Grass Green Sunbrella™ which is a bold, fairly bright green. I explained to him that if I patched the cover with new material it would look terrible because new bright material would stick out like a sore thumb on the faded older material. I laid a piece of new material on his old cover to prove my point.

To my astonishment the only difference between the two was his was a little dirty. Once it was cleaned and patched, there was no difference between the new fabric and the old even after constant exposure for twelve years. If your spa is outdoors and your tired of replacing spa covers due to sun damage you really need to get the only spa cover that is offered in Sunbrella™ fabric the SpaCap.